Tag: 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry

Jerome B. Baldwin

Jerome B. Baldwin

Jerome Baldwin

Jerome B. Baldwin was a resident of Mansfield on August 11, 1862 when he enlisted as a Corporal in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded June 15, 1864 at Petersburg, Virginia, promoted to Sergeant on November 26, 1864 and mustered out on June 16, 1865.

The descriptive muster roll for the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 18 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as 5’8” tall with a fair complexion and brown hair and grey eyes.  His marital status is single.

He was born September 14, 1843 in Mansfield to Raymond and Amanda (Lull) Baldwin. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 16 year old farmer in a household headed by Raymond Baldwin. Jerome moved to Willimantic by 1870 and married Ella Adams between 1870 and 1880. He was an insurance agent.

On December 28, 1871, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 171,232 that was granted under certificate No. 118,013. According to the list of pensioners on the roll in 1883, he was receiving $4 per month for a wounded left eye. Jerome Baldwin was listed as a member of the Francis S. Long Post, No. 30 G.A.R (Grand Army of the Republic) in Willimantic in June 1889.  His widow applied for a pension on April 18, 1918.

Jerome B. Baldwin died in Willimantic on January 19, 1918 and is buried at the Old Cemetery in Willimantic, Connecticut. 

The Baldwin Letters

This compilation of letters, written to Baldwin instead of being from Baldwin, allow for an inside look into the day-to-day life of a soldier rather than battlefield correspondences. These letters detail numerous topics including disease in the camp, life back home, and military placements. The letter below, from Samuel L. Morey, also speaks of the death of fellow soldier John A. Parker.

“I hope we shall live to meet again up in old Mansfield.”

Samuel L. Morey to Jerome Baldwin. December 24th, 1864
George D. Bennett

George D. Bennett

George D. Bennett was a resident of Mansfield on August 19, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was discharged June 8, 1865.

The descriptive muster roll for the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 34 and his occupation as peddler.  His is described as 5’10” tall with a light complexion and light hair and blue eyes.  His marital status is married.

He was born about 1828 and in the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 32 year old peddler and living in the household of his brother, Theodore Bennett. Theodore also enlisted in Co. D; both are sons of William and Harriet (Dunham) Bennett. A third brother, Seth D. Bennett served in Co. B of the 7th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. George married Mary E. Hall between 1860 and 1865. Children include William A. Bennett, born about 1866.

On February 29, 1872, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 172,961 that was granted under certificate No. 239,261. His widow applied for a pension on May 13, 1891.

George D. Bennett died on January 23, 1891 in Willimantic, Connecticut and is buried at the Spring Hill Cemetery in Mansfield.

Theodore F. Bennett

Theodore F. Bennett

Theodore F. Bennett was a resident of Mansfield on August 11, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was killed in action June 3, 1864 in Cold Harbor, Virginia. 

The following account of his death is from the 1864 diary of Alfred P. Hanks, a fellow soldier of Co. D:

 

While lying down in the line looking towards the enemy, T. F. Bennett, who lay side of his brother was hit by a Ball… He made no move only to straighten his body & was dead, without uttering a sound.

The Diary of Alfred Hanks, June 3, 1864

The descriptive muster roll for the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 33 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as 5’9” tall with a fair complexion and red hair and dark eyes.  His marital status is married.

He was born on December 25, 1829 in Mansfield. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 31 year old farmer and the head of household. His wife, Lucina, 24 and brother, George D.  Bennett, 32 are also living in the household. George also enlisted in Co. D; both are sons of William and Harriet (Dunham) Bennett. A third brother, Seth D. Bennett served in Co. B of the 7th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry.  Theodore married Lucina Dunham on March 20, 1854 in Mansfield. They had no children.

His young widow, Lucina, filed for a widow’s pension on September 19, 1864, No. 35,552 that was granted under certificate No. 45,117. According to the list of pensioners on the roll in 1883, she was receiving a widow’s pension of $8 per month that commenced in April, 1865.

Theodore F. Bennett is buried at the Spring Hill Cemetery in Mansfield.

Thomas Broadhurst

Thomas Broadhurst

Thomas Broadhurst was a resident of Mansfield on August 7, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was mustered out June 16, 1865.

The descriptive muster roll for the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 42 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as having a fair complexion with light hair and grey eyes.  His marital status is married. 

He was born about 1820 in England to Thomas Broadhurst and Jane Booth. After emigrating from England, Thomas first worked for the Cheney Brothers in South Manchester and was working in Mansfield Hollow when the Civil War started. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 40 year old silk dyer and the head of household. Thomas was married to Anna/Hannah _____ and had five children in his household. 

After the Civil War ended, he moved to Springfield and established the dye house business, T. Broadhurst and Sons. He was a member of G.A.R (Grand Army of the Republic) E. K. Wilcox Post 16.

On February 21, 1887, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 598,811 that was granted under certificate No. 768,723. His widow applied for a pension in 1894. Thomas Broadhurst died in Springfield, Massachusetts on January 23, 1894 and is buried at the Springfield Cemetery in Springfield, Massachusetts, Section: Bliss Avenue, Grave No. 1757.

John A. Brown

John A. Brown

John A. Brown was a resident of Ashford on August 8, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry; he was discharged June 24, 1865.

The descriptive muster roll for the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 33 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as 5’8” tall with a light complexion and blue eyes and brown hair.  His marital status is married.

He was born July 13, 1830 in Ashford, Connecticut probably to Eliphalet and Ermina (Preston) Brown. In the 1860 U.S. census in Ashford, he is a 30 year old farmer and head of household. John Brown married Sarah B. Simmons about 1856. Children include: Frederick E. Brown, born about 1857; Anna P. Brown, born about 1859 and Herbert L. Brown, born about 1861. After the Civil War, he returned to farming in Ashford.

On July 3, 1891, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 1,035,671 that was granted under certificate No. 817,017. His widow applied for a pension on April 30, 1908.

John A. Brown died on April 9, 1908 and is buried at the Mount Hope Cemetery in Mansfield.

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