Tag: Petersburg

Joseph H. Bacon

Joseph H. Bacon

Joseph H. Bacon was a resident of Barre, Massachusetts on July 17, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. E of the 34th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. He was a 21 year old Farmer at time of enlistment, wounded April 2, 1865 near Petersburg, Virginia and mustered out July 5, 1865.

He was born November 4, 1844 in Barre, Massachusetts to Willard and Fanny (Lamb) Bacon. In the 1860 U.S. census in Barre, Massachusetts, he is a 16 year old farm laborer living in the household of John T. Ellsworth. After the Civil War, he returned to Barre and his former job as a farm laborer for John Ellsworth. Between 1870 and 1880, he moved to Mansfield and was working in the handle shop owned by Lathrop H. Hooker. Joseph Bacon married one of his daughters, Jennie L. Hooker on September 22, 1880 in Mansfield. They adopted a daughter, Lina E. Bacon, born about July 1882 and may have had one more child that died before 1910.

On April 14, 1873, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 182,914 that was granted under Certificate No. 125,823. His widow applied for a pension on May 15, 1915.

Joseph H. Bacon died on April 14, 1915 and is buried at the Mount Hope Cemetery in Mansfield.

Samuel Burden

Samuel Burden

Samuel Burden was a resident of Mansfield on January 9, 1864 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. K of the 29th (Colored) Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry.  According to army records, he was killed September 1, 1864 at Petersburg, Virginia.  His military file indicates that the report of his death was written on September 1, 1864.

The descriptive muster roll for the 29th (Colored) Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 18 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as 5’8” tall with a black complexion and black hair and eyes.  His marital status is single.

He was born about 1842 in Virginia and he was not living in Mansfield in the 1860 U.S. census.

Samuel Burden died on August 25, 1864 and is believed to be buried as Samuel Burton at the Poplar Grove National Cemetery in Petersburg, Virginia, Site No. 2250. The original burial place was on the battlefield at Fort Stedman.

In Literature

On page 18 of his book: A Sketch of the 29th Regiment of Connecticut Colored Troops, author Isaac J. Hill stated that Private Samuel Burton of Company K was killed on August 25, 1864 by being shot in the head while moving the company. There is no Samuel Burton in Co. K, only a Samuel Burden. National Cemetery burial records show the burial of Samuel Burton instead of Samuel Burden with a death date of June 18, 1864. The military file of Samuel Burden indicated that he was killed near Petersburg, Virginia and was buried in the field. Regimental records document that the 29th Connecticut did not arrive in Virginia until August 14, 1864 and did not enter the trenches of Petersburg until August 24, 1864. It appears that the Samuel Burton buried in the Poplar Grove National Cemetery in Petersburg, Virginia is Samuel Burden and the death date should be August 25, 1864.

William H. Corbit

William H. Corbit

William H. Corbit was a resident of Mansfield on August 11, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. D of the 14th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Maryland, promoted to Corporal February 9, 1863, wounded June 17, 1864, Petersburg, Virginia, promoted to Sergeant January  29, 1865 and mustered out May 31, 1865.

He was born October 28, 1840 in Three Rivers, Massachusetts to Jason and Mary Ann (Brise) Corbit. After the Civil War, he returned to Mansfield and was employed as a painter and a paper hanger. William Corbit married Mary J. Mowry about 1862. They had four children including: Eldora Corbit, born about 1866 and Grace, born about October, 1869.

On August 14, 1869, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 146,886 that was granted under certificate No. 101,607. According to the list of pensioners on the roll in 1883, he was receiving $6 per month for a wounded left side and arm.

William H. Corbit died on November 30, 1930 and is buried at North Center Cemetery in Coventry, Connecticut.

John Harris

John Harris

John Harris was a resident of Mansfield on December 30, 1863 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. Cof the 31st Regiment United States Colored Troops.  He was wounded in the leg on August 11, 1864 while in a rifle pit in Petersburg, Virginia. He was sent to the Satterlee Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and is said to have deserted from there in September 1864.

The descriptive muster roll of the 31st Regiment United States Colored Troops lists his age as 21 and his occupation as sailor.  He is described as 5’ 4” tall with a black complexion and black hair and black eyes.  No marital status is recorded.

He was born about 1842 in Patterson, New Jersey. John Harris was not a resident of Mansfield in the 1860 U.S. census; no further information is known.

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