Tag: Samuel L. Morey

Jerome B. Baldwin

Jerome B. Baldwin

Jerome Baldwin

Jerome B. Baldwin was a resident of Mansfield on August 11, 1862 when he enlisted as a Corporal in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded June 15, 1864 at Petersburg, Virginia, promoted to Sergeant on November 26, 1864 and mustered out on June 16, 1865.

The descriptive muster roll for the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 18 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as 5’8” tall with a fair complexion and brown hair and grey eyes.  His marital status is single.

He was born September 14, 1843 in Mansfield to Raymond and Amanda (Lull) Baldwin. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 16 year old farmer in a household headed by Raymond Baldwin. Jerome moved to Willimantic by 1870 and married Ella Adams between 1870 and 1880. He was an insurance agent.

On December 28, 1871, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 171,232 that was granted under certificate No. 118,013. According to the list of pensioners on the roll in 1883, he was receiving $4 per month for a wounded left eye. Jerome Baldwin was listed as a member of the Francis S. Long Post, No. 30 G.A.R (Grand Army of the Republic) in Willimantic in June 1889.  His widow applied for a pension on April 18, 1918.

Jerome B. Baldwin died in Willimantic on January 19, 1918 and is buried at the Old Cemetery in Willimantic, Connecticut. 

The Baldwin Letters

This compilation of letters, written to Baldwin instead of being from Baldwin, allow for an inside look into the day-to-day life of a soldier rather than battlefield correspondences. These letters detail numerous topics including disease in the camp, life back home, and military placements. The letter below, from Samuel L. Morey, also speaks of the death of fellow soldier John A. Parker.

“I hope we shall live to meet again up in old Mansfield.”

Samuel L. Morey to Jerome Baldwin. December 24th, 1864
Samuel L. Morey

Samuel L. Morey

Morey/Mowrey/Mowry

Samuel Ladoit Morey was a resident of Mansfield on August 7, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. In April, 1863, He was sent to the U.S. General Hospital at Hampton, Virginia for Ascitis, an abnormal buildup of fluid in his abdomen. He was transferred to the 32nd Co. 2nd Battalion Veterans Reserve Corp on January 25, 1864 and discharged on September 4, 1865.

Soldiers in the Veterans Reserve Corp were men who could no longer serve on the front lines due to illness or severe injury. These units guarded prisoners, worked as cooks or at hospitals to free up able bodied soldiers. The 32nd Co. 2nd Battalion Veterans Reserve Corp was stationed at the U.S. General Hospital at Hampton, Virginia. In a letter from Samuel Morey to Jerome Baldwin, he stated that he had escorted an insane man to the insane asylum in Washington, D.C. and also worked in the knapsack room at the hospital.

The descriptive muster roll of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 24 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as 5’ 11” tall with a dark complexion and dark eyes and dark hair.  His marital status is married. 

He was born March 8, 1838 in Mansfield to Charles Lee and Eunice (Church) Morey/Mowry, In the 1850 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is enumerated as Ladoyt Mowrey, a 12 year old living in the household of Charles L. Mowrey. Samuel Morey married Mary Ann Buckingham on September 10, 1860 in Windham, Connecticut.   After the Civil War, he was a farm laborer by the 1870 U.S. census in Windham, Connecticut.

Samuel L. Morey died on July 22, 1892 in Mansfield and is buried at the Atwoodville Cemetery in Mansfield.

John A. Parker

John A. Parker

John A. Parker was a resident of Mansfield on August 11, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry; he died December 17, 1864. In a December 21, 1864 letter written at the U.S. General Hospital in Hampton, Virginia, Samuel L. Morey informs Jerome B. Baldwin that John A. Parker entered the hospital, sick last month and died the previous Saturday. He further stated that Julian came to the hospital and sent his body home by express. Julian was Julian Parker, brother of John A. Parker. All four soldiers had served in Co. D of the 21st Regiment C.V.I. and were from Mansfield. The Mansfield death record stated that he died from chronic diarrhea at Fort Monroe in Virginia.

The descriptive muster roll of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 21 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as 5’ 7” tall with a fair complexion and brown eyes and brown hair.  His marital status is single. 

He was born in 1841 to Charles and Ann/Anna (Utley) Parker. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 19 year old farm laborer in the household of Charles Parker. One brother in the household, Julian N. Parker, enlisted in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry on the same day as John A. Parker.

Anna Parker applied for a dependent mother’s pension on March 18, 1870, No. 185,218 that was granted under certificate No. 152,804.

John A. Parker died on December 17, 1864 at Hampton, Virginia and is buried at the Gurleyville Cemetery in Mansfield.

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