Tag: Drewry's Bluff

Wesley Brown

Wesley Brown

Wesley Brown was a resident of Mansfield on September 5, 1861 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. B of the 10th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry; he reenlisted as a veteran reenlistment on January 1, 1864.  He was wounded October 7, 1864 at Newmarket Road, Virginia and August 16, 1864, at Drewry’s Bluff, Virginia.  He was mustered out August 25, 1865.

He was born about December, 1840, probably in Mansfield to John and Abigail Maria (Fenton) Brown. In the 1860 U.S. census in Coventry, he is a 19 year old farmer in the household of Lyman Starkweather. Lyman’s wife is Abigail M. and three of Wesley’s siblings are living in the household; it appears that Lyman Starkweather is his stepfather. After the Civil War, he returned to Coventry and worked as a farm laborer. In both the 1880 and 1900 U.S. censuses, he is living in the Coventry household headed by a sibling or a brother-in-law. Wesley Brown never married, and after 1900, he moved to the Fitch’s Home for Soldiers in Darien.

On September 16, 1882, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 460,115 that was granted under certificate No. 518,271. The pension index also states that he served in Co. E of 3rd United States Artillery Regiment.

Wesley Brown died on November 7, 1909 at Fitch’s Home for Soldiers in Darien, Connecticut and is buried at the Fitch’s Home for Soldiers Cemetery also known as the Spring Grove Cemetery in Darien, Connecticut.

Alvin M. Crane

Alvin M. Crane

Alvin Millen Crane/Crain was a resident of Mansfield on August 7, 1862 when he enlisted as a 2nd Lieutenant in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant July 31, 1863 and to Captain, October 12, 1864. Alvin Crane was wounded May 16, 1864 at Drewry’s Bluff, Virginia and was mustered out June 16, 1865. 

The descriptive muster roll of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 23 and his occupation as student.  He is described as 5’ 9” tall with a fair complexion and dark hair and eyes.  His marital status is single.

He was born August 3, 1839 in Mansfield to Millen and Sally (Bennett) Crain/Crane. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 20 year old farmer in the household of Millen Crane. After the Civil War, he attended Brown University, graduating in 1869 and then he went to Newton Theological Seminary in Newton, Massachusetts, graduating in 1872. He became a Baptist minister and served in the following Massachusetts towns: Medfield, West Boylston, Shelburne Falls, Millbury, Groton and Everett. Alvin Crane married Sarah G. Adams on July 13, 1869 in Mansfield. They had one child, Judson Adams Crane, born May 7, 1884 in Shelburne, Massachusetts; Sarah G. (Adams) Crane died four days later, on May 11, 1884.  Alvin married, second, Sarah Jane Wilson on October 20, 1885 in Boston, Massachusetts; they had no children.

Alvin Crane was the historian of the 21st Regimental Association and one of the three captains on the executive committee that worked on the writing and publication of the regimental history. 

On May 11, 1904, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 1,315,556 that was granted under certificate No. 1,085,219. 

Alvin M. Crane died on April 22, 1922 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania according to pension records; his burial place is not known.

Mitchell Laforce

Mitchell Laforce

Mitchell Laforce was a resident of Mansfield on February 19, 1864 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. B of the 7th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded May 14, 1864 at Drewry’s Bluff, Virginia and he deserted July 16, 1864.

He was not living in Mansfield in the 1860 U.S. census; no further information is known.

Henry W. Thorne

Henry W. Thorne

Henry W. Thorne was a resident of Mansfield on August 7, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry; he was killed in action at Drewry’s Bluff, Virginia on May 16, 1864. His death was recorded in the diary of Alfred P. Hanks.

“Thorn of our Co. was instantly killed being shot through the head”

Hanks Diary, May 16, 1864

The descriptive muster roll of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 25 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as 5’ 7” tall with a fair complexion and dark eyes and brown hair.  His marital status is single. 

He may have been the Henry Thorne, born about 1837 in Massachusetts. In the 1860 U.S. census, Henry W. Thorne is living in Willimantic, Connecticut.  He is listed as 23 year old farmer in the household of Rebecca Ester.

Henry W. Thorne is buried at the Old Willimantic Cemetery in Windham, Connecticut. The other faces of this large monument and surrounding stones are for Edwin M. Thorne, a fellow soldier in the 25th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, and the rest of his family. They are probable brothers. A plate of the monument is for Martha A. Thorne, born about 1802; she may be their mother.

James M. Topliff

James M. Topliff

James M. Topliff was a resident of Windham on August 18, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded May 16, 1864 at Drewry’s Bluff, Virginia and discharged June 1, 1865.

The descriptive muster roll of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 18 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as 5’ 5” tall with a dark complexion and dark eyes and brown hair.  His marital status is single.

He was born about 1843 in Mansfield probably to Francis and Chloe _____ Topliff. In the 1860 U.S. census in Windham, he is a 17 year old farm laborer in the household of Zalman Church. After his Civil War service, he lived in Mansfield and worked as a farm laborer. James Topliff married Mary ____ between 1860 and 1870. He married second, Mary Jane Hutchins, between 1870 and 1880. She was the daughter of George H. Hutchins, a soldier of Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry who was killed at Petersburg, Virginia. Children with his second wife include: George A. Topliff, born about 1879.

On December 20, 1880, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 413,242 that was granted under certificate No. 346,422.  A pension application was filed at a later date for minor children.

James M. Topliff died on July 3, 1900 in Mansfield and is buried at the New Mansfield Center Cemetery in Mansfield.

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