Tag: New Mansfield Center Cemetery

James A. H. Bowers

James A. H. Bowers

James A. H. Bowers was a resident of Mansfield on September 18, 1861 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. B of the 10th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, he reenlisted as a veteran on February 7, 1864 and was mustered out August 25, 1865.

He was born about 1835 in Hampton, Connecticut to Alpheus and Lucy (Flint) Bowers. One brother, Ira M. Bowers, enlisted in the 18th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry and the 1st Maine Heavy Artillery from Millbridge, Maine.

In the 1860 U.S. census in Killingly, Connecticut, James was a 15 year old in the household of Alpheas Bowers.  After the Civil War, he moved in Mansfield and was a farmer. James Bowers married Marie/Mariah  ______ between 1860 and 1870. Children include: Emma Bowers, born about 1860.

On July 16, 1890, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 894,843 that was granted under certificate No. 730,062.

James A. H. Bowers died on November 4, 1921 and was buried at the New Mansfield Center Cemetery in Mansfield.

Charles Button

Charles Button

Charles Button was a resident of Colchester on December 3, 1861 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. K of the 11th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry; he was discharged for disability June 1, 1863.

He was born about April, 1836 in Connecticut and in the 1860 U.S. census in East Haddam, Connecticut, he is a 23 year old laborer in the household of J. B. Emmons. After his Civil War service, he returned to East Haddam. Charles Button married Charlotte Banning between 1860 and 1870. She died on February 12, 1889 and he married, second, Mary A. _____ by 1900. There are no known children from either marriage. He was a farmer in East Haddam and by the date of the 1900 U.S. census, he was a candy peddler. Charles Button was a 74 year old inmate of Fitch’s Home for Soldiers in Darien in the 1910 U.S. census and is a widower.

On August 29, 1879, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 306,593 that was granted under certificate No. 955,835.

Charles Button died on October 1, 1917 at Fitch’s Home for Soldiers in Darien and he is buried at the New Mansfield Center Cemetery in Mansfield.

Madison L. Cross

Madison L. Cross

Madison Lucius Cross was a resident of Mansfield on August 11, 1862 when he enlisted as a Corporal in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to Sergeant November 19, 1863 and mustered out June 16, 1865.

The descriptive muster roll of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 19 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as 5’ 7” tall with a dark complexion with black hair and black eyes.  His marital status is single.

He was born July 8, 1843 to Lucius W. and Harriet (Swift) Cross. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 17 year old farmer in the household of Lucius W. Cross. He married Lucy A. Fitch on November 25, 1867 in Mansfield and they moved to Willimantic where he was a farmer. Children include: Alice M. Cross, born about 1871; L. Howard Cross, born about 1875 and Edwin F. Cross, born about 1879.

Madison L. Cross died on May 15, 1898 in Middletown and is buried at the New Mansfield Center Cemetery in Mansfield.

Enoch Dodd

Enoch Dodd

Enoch Dodd was a resident of Mansfield on August 24, 1861 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. H of the 7th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He reenlisted as a veteran on December 22, 1863, was promoted to Corporal July 1, 1865 and he was mustered out July 20, 1865.

He was born to Samuel and Mary A. _____ Dodd about 1835. There are conflicting birth places in several census records and the death record has Michigan crossed out and Kingston, Canada written in. Since both the 1900 and 1910 U.S. censuses give Canada as his place of birth and he is listed as a naturalized alien who immigrated about 1834, Kingston, Canada may be correct. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 26 year old farm laborer and head of household. After the Civil War, he returned to Mansfield and continued to work as a farm laborer.

Enoch married Mary Emily Perkins, born in Mansfield on January 28, 1853, in Marlborough, Connecticut. They had the following children: Victor H. Dodd, born September 15, 1854; Annie E. Dodd, born September 22, 1856; Annette F. Dodd, born about 1858 and Charlie Dodd, born February 22, 1861. Emily (Perkins) Dodd died on October 8, 1862 in Mansfield and Enoch married second, Caroline Wilbur about 1870. They had one child, Gertrude, born February 13, 1875; Caroline (Wilbur) Dodd died August 30, 1881. Enoch Dodd married third, Katie Smith on September 8, 1882 in Mansfield. Enoch married fourth, Julia M. Copeland about 1884. Their children include: Llewelyn (or Louis V.) Dodd, born about January 1889, Gertrude A. Dodd, born about June 1890; Robert L. Dodd, born December 23, 1892; Florence E. Dodd born about July 1895 and Alfred Dodd, born about 1900.

On July 8, 1890, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 887,647 that was granted under certificate No. 755,920. His widow applied for a pension in 1911.

Enoch Dodd died on December 22, 1910 in Mansfield and he is buried at the New Mansfield Center Cemetery in Mansfield.

Charles Fenton

Charles Fenton

Charles Fenton was a resident of Mansfield on August 7, 1862 when he enlisted as a 1st Sergeant in Co. D of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant July 31, 1863, 1st Lieutenant in Co. C, November 16, 1864 and to Captain in Co. F, January 11, 1865. He was mustered out June 16, 1865.

The descriptive muster roll of the 21st Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry lists his age as 21 and his occupation as farmer.  He is described as being 6’ tall with a light complexion and brown hair and dark eyes.  His marital status is single.

He was born August 27, 1840 in Crown Point, New York to Horace and Mary (Huestis) Fenton. His father was born in Mansfield and returned there after the death of his wife. Charles Fenton began working in the Mansfield Hollow Silk Mills in 1852 when he was only 12 years old. He gained an extensive knowledge of silk spinning and weaving techniques.

After he returned from the Civil War, he was appointed manager of the O. S. Chaffee silk mill. After working as a traveling salesman for Nonotuck Silk Company of Haydenville, Massachusetts in 1870, he moved to Maine where he was superintendent of the Haskell silk mills in Westbrook, Maine from 1874 through 1887. In 1887, he became superintendent of the Natchaug Silk Company on North Street in Willimantic, Connecticut. The Natchaug Silk Company was taken over by the L.D. Brown Silk Company in Middletown in 1895 and he moved there. 

Charles Fenton formed the Windham Silk Company in Willimantic and moved back there in 1901. This company employed between 150 and 200 workers and was known for high quality silk cloths. He retired from the business in 1913. He married Cornelia J. Hall on February 12, 1867; she died in 1887. His second wife was Sarah A. Hall, a cousin of his first wife. In 1890, he married Sarah Davis Weeks of Gilford, New Hampshire and she survived him. Charles Fenton’s children with Cornelia include Mary C. Fenton (May 10, 1869 – February 1, 1907) and Robert Fenton, (born about 1872). 

On April 16, 1904, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 1,0312,374 that was granted under certificate No. 1,086,591. His widow, Sarah applied for a pension in August 1921.
Charles Fenton was a founding member of the Francis S. Long Post, No. 30 G.A.R (Grand Army of the Republic) in Willimantic. He was treasurer of the 21st Connecticut Regimental Association. He died on August 7, 1921 and is buried in the New Mansfield Center Cemetery in Mansfield.

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