Tag: 18th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry

Charles B. Baldwin

Charles B. Baldwin

Charles B. Baldwin was a resident of Mansfield on July 30, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. F of the 18th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was killed in action on June 15, 1863 in Winchester, Virginia.

“Two companies, one of which was company F, charged on a body of rebels on the Berryville Road, and captured twelve guns, and took four prisoners. They were ordered to fall back, but Charles Baldwin of Mansfield staid behind, probably not hearing the order. A rebel Lieutenant and two privates came out of the woods, and one ordered him to surrender. He refused, and raised his gun to shoot the rebel, but the gun only snapped the cap, and the rebel Lieutenant shot him through the bowels with his carbine. He was buried where he fell, by a citizen who owned the property.”

The Willimantic Journal reported the above account that was communicated by Corporal Chas. D. Burdick, Co. F 18th C.V.I. July 24, 1863

He was born July 4, 1845 to Seth P. and Celinda (Farnham) Baldwin. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 15 year old living in the household of Seth P. Baldwin.

Seth P. Baldwin applied for a dependent father’s pension. According to the Pension List of 1883, he was receiving a pension of $8 per month that commenced in October, 1872.

Charles Baldwin shares a headstone with his father at the New Storrs Cemetery in Mansfield.

William H. Campbell

William H. Campbell

William H. Campbell was a resident of Mansfield on July 17, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. F of the 18th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was captured June 15, 1863, Winchester, Virginia, paroled on July 14, 1863 and he died September 10, 1863.

He was born about 1846 in Connecticut to William and Nancy M. _____ Campbell. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 14 year old in the household of Nancy M. Campbell.

Nancy M. Campbell applied for a dependent mother’s pension on August 8, 1864, No. 60,188 that was granted under certificate No. 151,803.

William H. Campbell was about 17 years old when he died; his burial place is unknown.

Judson T. Carpenter

Judson T. Carpenter

Judson T. Carpenter was a resident of Mansfield on July 21, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. F of the 18th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was discharged November 20, 1862.

He was born on January 31, 1833 in Ashford, Connecticut to Uriah B. and Marcia (Scarborough) Carpenter. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 27 year old operative and head of household. Judson Carpenter married Clarissa Perrin on April 10, 1853 in Eastford, Connecticut. Children include: Francis A. Carpenter, born about 1855; Susie Carpenter, born about 1861; Carrie Carpenter, born about 1863 and Harry Carpenter, born about 1866. Clarissa (Perrin) Carpenter died in 1869. Judson Carpenter married second, Adaline L. ____ about 1875; they had no children.

Judson was working in a boot factory in the 1870 U.S. census in Brookfield, Massachusetts. He was living in Holliston, Massachusetts by the date of the 1890 Veterans Census. In 1900, he is the superintendent of the Town Farm in Holliston.

On January 16, 1891, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 980,035 that was granted under certificate No. 677,344. His widow applied for a pension on May 19, 1908.

Judson T. Carpenter died on January 7, 1903 and is buried at the Brookfield Cemetery in Brookfield, Massachusetts.

Lucius P. Clark

Lucius P. Clark

Lucius P. Clark was a resident of Mansfield on July 21, 1862 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. I of the 18th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was captured June 15, 1863 at Winchester, Virginia, was paroled July 19, 1863 and mustered out June 27, 1865. 

He was born about 1836 probably to Lucius and Catherine (Powell) Clark in Coventry. In the 1860 U.S. census in Coventry, he is a 26 year old day laborer and head of household; the previous household is the family of Lucius and Catherine Clark. Lucius Clark married Emily A. _____ between 1850 and 1860. He moved to New Britain by the 1870 U.S. census and was employed as a carpenter/joiner; this is the same occupation as his father. Between 1880 and 1889, he was a resident of Fitch’s Soldiers Home in Darien.

On January 21, 1887, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 594,393 that was granted under certificate No. 914,276. His widow applied for a pension on December 20, 1899.

Lucius P. Clark died on November 24, 1899 at Fitch’s Soldiers’ Home in Darien, Connecticut and is buried at the Fairview Cemetery in New Britain, Connecticut.

Prescott W. Daniels

Prescott W. Daniels

Prescott Waite Daniels was a resident of Mansfield when he enlisted as a Private in Co. I of the 18th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry under the name of Prescott Waite; he transferred to Co. I, 1st United States Infantry May 23, 1865 and was discharged October 20, 1865.

He was born about 1840 in Connecticut. In the 1860 U.S. census in New London, he is enumerated as a 19 year old seaman born in Connecticut included among seamen registered at the U.S. Customs House in New London. After the Civil War, he returned to Connecticut and was working as a painter in Coventry in the 1880 U.S. census. Prescott Daniels married Rose H. Robinson between 1870 and 1880; they had no known children.

On December 2, 1886, he applied for an invalid pension under No. 590,465 that was granted under certificate No. 431,249. His widow applied for a pension on August 27, 1892.

On May 11, 1889, he applied for an invalid pension under No. 703,195 that was granted under certificate No. 483,005.

Prescott Waite Daniels died on November 29, 1892 and is buried at the Nathan Hale Cemetery in Coventry.

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