Tag: William H. Hall

Battle of Antietam

Battle of Antietam

Battle of Antietam, Library of Congress

On September 17, 1862, Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia clashed with George B. McClellan’s Army of the Potomac at Sharpsburg, Maryland. This twelve hour battle was the single bloodiest day in American history with 23,000 men killed, wounded or missing.

Union General Ambrose Burnsides ordered the IX Corp to take the lower bridge that spanned Antietam Creek. The Confederate forces were not numerically superior but took positions commanding the heights on the other side of the creek, on the bluffs and in a quarry.

The first assault at 9:00 A.M., by two companies of skirmishers of the 11th Ohio Volunteers was repulsed. Colonel Henry W. Kingsbury led an assault by the 11th Connecticut Volunteers at 10 A.M. In an extended front they moved forward to the rail fence and the stone wall near the South and North sides of the bridge. Captain John Griswold of A company plunged into the swift flowing creek with several men but were met by a volley of small arms fire. He was wounded and made it to the far side of the creek where he died. The remaining men had turned back and the regiment was finally forced to retire under the heavy fire of the well concealed Confederates. Colonel Kingsbury died after being wounded multiple times and the 11th Connecticut Volunteers suffered over 130 casualties, representing one third of their men.Two Mansfield soldiers from Co. K of the 11th Connecticut Volunteers were killed in the battle, William H. Hall and Asa W. Rouse.

Lorenzo A. Hall

Lorenzo A. Hall

Lorenzo Ambrose Hall was a resident of Mansfield on August 22, 1861 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. H of the 7th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry; he was wounded October 22, 1862, Pocotaligo, South Carolina and discharged September 7, 1864, time expired.

He was born about 1841 in Mansfield to Ambrose and Esther (Batten) Hall. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 19 year old farm laborer in the household of Ambrose Hall. His brother, William H. Hall, a 15 year old in the same household was a Mansfield Civil War soldier killed at the Battle of Antietam.  After his Civil War service, Lorenzo moved to Danvers, Massachusetts about 1870 and worked in a shoe factory. He married Amanda Durfee about 1865. Their children were born in Danvers, Massachusetts and include: John Lawson Hall, born September 27, 1865; Jane Violetta Hall, born November 9, 1866; Jerry/Jeremiah Lorenzo Hall, born October 18, 1867; Julia Esther Hall, born December 25, 1868 or and Addie Francis Hall, born April 9, 1870. Lorenzo married second, Annie O’Leary on July 3, 1877 in Danvers.

On May 27, 1880, he applied for an invalid pension, No. 366,164 that was granted under certificate No. 220,918. His widow applied for a pension on March 19, 1900.

Lorenzo Hall died on February 26, 1900 in Danvers, Massachusetts and is buried in Salem, Massachusetts.

Seth Hall

Seth Hall

Seth Hall was a 22 year old resident of Mansfield on August 29, 1863 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. D of the 22nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry; he received a discharge for disability on November 5, 1863. He is also probably the Seth Hall from Mansfield who enlisted on February 6, 1865 as a Private in Co. G of the 14th Regiment United States Infantry; he deserted on August 11, 1865.

He may be the Seth M. Hall, born about 1842 in Mansfield to Ambrose and Esther (Batten) Hall. Seth M. Hall is living in his father’s household in 1850, 1860 and 1880 but not 1870. There is a Seth Hall living in Mansfield as a ward of the town in the 1900 U.S. census with a birth year of 1832.

If he is that Seth Hall, two of his brothers served in the Civil War from Mansfield, Lorenzo and William Hall.

William H. Hall

William H. Hall

William Harlow Hall was a resident of Mansfield on October 31, 1861 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. H of the 11th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry; he was killed in action on September 17, 1862 at Antietam, Maryland. The regiment was ordered to take the lower stone bridge over Antietam Creek and the assault began at 10 A.M. Over one third of the regiment was killed, wounded or missing in that battle. Asa W. Rouse, another Mansfield soldier from Co. H was also killed in the assault.

William H. Hall was born about 1844 in Mansfield to Ambrose and Esther (Batten) Hall. In the 1860 U.S. census in Mansfield, he is a 15 year old farm laborer in the household of Ambrose Hall. His brother, Lorenzo Ambrose Hall, a 19 year old farm laborer in the same household, was also a Mansfield Civil War soldier.

On December 21, 1872, Ambrose Hall applied for a dependant Father’s pension, No. 202,499 that was granted under Certificate No. 286,763. 
William H. Hall is buried at the Bedlam Cemetery in Chaplin, Connecticut. His name is listed among the killed in action on the monument of the 11th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry Regiment on the battlefield at Antietam, Maryland.

Asa W. Rouse

Asa W. Rouse

Asa W. Rouse was a resident of Mansfield on November 30, 1861 when he enlisted as a Private in Co. H of the 11th Regiment Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was killed in action on September 17, 1862 at Antietam, Maryland. The regiment was ordered to take the lower stone bridge over Antietam Creek and the assault began at 10 A.M. Over one third of the regiment was killed, wounded or missing in that battle. William H. Hall, another Mansfield soldier from Co. H was also killed in the assault.

He was born about 1833 in Connecticut, probably to John and Thirza (Massby) Rouse of Groton. In the 1860 U.S. census in Norwich, he is a 27 year old stone cutter. 

On November 4, 1862, his widow, Ann J. Rouse applied for a widow’s pension, No. 5,729 that was granted under Certificate No. 1,846. In the pension file is certification of their marriage and the births of their children. Asa W. Rouse married Ann J. Parkerson at West Greenwich, Rhode Island on November 25, 1858. Their first child, Lovell N. Rouse was born in Norwich, Connecticut on November 19, 1859 and their second child, Mary E. Rouse was born in Windham, Connecticut on April 27, 1862.  The death of Asa Rouse left behind a widow, a three year old son and a 4 month old daughter. Both of the children died in 1863.

Asa W. Rouse was buried at the Yantic Cemetery in Norwich, Connecticut. His name is listed among the killed in action on the monument of the 11th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry Regiment on the battlefield at Antietam, Maryland.

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